PNWE In the News

Below are the instances of the Pacific Northwest English Study appearing in the news:

Year

Interview Title

Interviewer

Description

2019
Deborah Wang again interviews Alicia Wassink about Pacific Northwest English.
2017
Interview and blog post by Amy Rolph.
2014
Deborah Wang interviews Alicia Wassink about the PNWE. Story ranked #1 for all of 2014 on KUOW.

This list contains information about past interviews for which there are no longer a stable web link:

Year

Interview Title

Interviewer

Description

2011
Is there a Seattle Accent?
Reporter Joe Fryer/King 5 News interviews Prof. Betsy Evans, in this story "Is there a Seattle Accent?"
2011
Why we don’t have an accent … or do we?
Bellamy Pailthorp, KPLU radio, interviews Alicia Wassink as part of the series "I Wonder Why"
2008
Collecting fond memories of Seattle's Yesler Terrace
Stories delight Jean Harris. They reaffirm her effort to collect and preserve oral histories from her fellow "alumni" of Yesler Terrace, the first racially integrated public-housing project in America. From The Seattle Times, July 17, 2008.
2006
Do you sound like a Northwesterner?
How do you pronounce "caught" and "cot"? If they sound the same, you've got the regional lingo, a PSU professor says. From The Oregonian, February 26, 2006.
2005
Pacific Northwest Spoken Here
Could it be we really do talk different 'round here? Conventional wisdom holds that Northwest has NO accent. But linguistic researchers at the University of Washington and Portland State are making the case that the Northwest HAS a distinctive dialect. Audio available from the KUOW website. Program air date: July 7, 2005
2005
Readers react to P-I story study suggesting people here have a distinctive voice. From the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 27, 2005.
2005
Contrary to belief, local linguists say Northwest has distinctive dialect
Listen for the creaky voice, the strong "s" and the "low-back merger." Most language experts believe the Pacific Northwest has no distinctive voice, no particular style or dialect. But some local linguists think that's wrong -- or at least a long-standing academic prejudice that deserves a good challenge. From the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 20, 2005.